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House Judiciary Committee Web Page Labeled “Hilariously Terrible”

This is snarky fun. Brenda Barron on the Elegant Themes website recently wrote about Bad Web Design: A Look At The Most Hilariously Terrible Websites From Around The Web. She tags a lot of really bad, even painfully bad, web sites. Although she describes the House Judiciary Committee web site as “appropriate” for the US House of Representatives with a nice clean layout with good navigation, she focuses on one page that made her do a double take.

[T]he presence of Jenifer Lawrence asking “What?” on a page at the US House of Representatives Judiciary Committee made me ask “What?” Then I scrolled down to see Ariel bounding her chin in the palm of her hand, and several others with surprised looks, pointing, and bounding around. None of this animated gif craziness fits the topic on the page. And it only takes 20 seconds to go from annoying to beyond annoying. Try it out and you’ll agree.

The article is a 10-point numbered list. What’s it about? IDK. Something about legislation. I couldn’t read it. Maybe that was the point. In that case it worked. Designers design pages as well as layouts, and this goes to show that even a well-designed layout can be ruined by an inappropriately designed page. Nothing on this page fits the theme of the site. Looking at it make my eyes hurt.

Have a look at this completely non-partisan, appropriately dignified and judicious page before it goes away: AT THE FLICK OF A SWITCH “Right now, one single person – the President of the United States – can turn off the enforcement of our immigration laws unilaterally. For real.” Press Release. (Mar 18 2015).

CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.


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