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State-by-State Report on Authentication of Online Legal Resources

While there is an abundance of state legal resources (laws, regulations, court opinions, etc), in most cases they can’t be used in courts of law or for other legal purposes because its the print version that is considered “legally official.”

The American Association of Law Libraries has just released this new 50 state report outlining the status of online legal materials:

State-by-State Report on Authentication of Online Legal Resources

This report was released in conjunction with the National Summit on Authentication of Digital Information, which AALL held April 20-21 in Chicago. According to AALL, The 50 delegates who participated in this event were a distinguished group of individuals: judges, state government officials, attorneys, and leaders of AALL and of other organizations, such as the American Bar Association. They were invited because of their interest and expertise in some aspect of legal/government information.

Proceedings from the summit will shortly be posted to the AALL web site.

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