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Free Government Information (FGI) is a place for initiating dialogue and building consensus among the various players (libraries, government agencies, non-profit organizations, researchers, journalists, etc.) who have a stake in the preservation of and perpetual free access to government information. FGI promotes free government information through collaboration, education, advocacy and research.

Toward a Shared Agenda: Report on PEGI Project Activities for 2017-2019

PEGI final report The Preservation of Electronic Government Information (PEGI) Project has now finished its 2-year IMLS grant work and have just published its final report Toward a Shared Agenda: Report on PEGI Project Activities for 2017-2019. Please have a read and send any feedback on the report and our next steps to [email protected] or via Twitter @PEGIProject. And stay tuned for more good work from PEGI Project!

This report provides a summary of work completed by the Preservation of Electronic Government Information (PEGI) project from 2017 to 2019. The PEGI Project seeks to address national concerns regarding the preservation of electronic government information by cultural memory organizations for long term use by the public.

A significant part of our efforts in 2018 focused on analyzing the possibility of using the Collective Impact model to organize collaborative preservation work. This report shares an overview of project activities and conversations, analysis of the findings, and presents next steps for project activities.

Authored by Dr. Martin Halbert, Roberta Sittel, Dr. Katherine Skinner, Deborah Caldwell, Marie Concannon, James R. Jacobs, Shari Laster, and Scott Matheson.

This project was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services #LG-88-17-0129-17. We are grateful to James Neal for his support and encouragement as our program officer. For more information about the project, please visit the official project website.

via Toward a Shared Agenda: Report on PEGI Project Activities for 2017-2019 | Educopia Institute.

Do Not Assume PDF files are all permanent

Government information relies heavily on the PDF format. Indeed, PDF files are used so widely that it is tempting for us to assume that PDF files are, by definition, a safe way of preserving information for the long term. Would it surprise you to learn that the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) lists PDF files as “Endangered” and that even PDF/A files are “Vulnerable”?

These judgements are in the DPC’s newest list of “digitally endangered species.”

The Bit List includes 74 content types and groups them (more…)

NARA releases Digital Preservation Framework for public comment

Photograph of World’s First Computer, the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Calculator. National Archives Identifier 594262 The Archivist of the US (AOTUS) released NARA’s plan for a Digital Preservation Framework consisting of a “Risk and Prioritization Matrix” and 15 File Format Preservation Action Plans. NARA is asking that the public submit comments on NARA’s GitHub site through November 1, 2019.

In particular, we are hoping to get feedback on the following topics:

  • What revisions can you suggest to the proposed processing and preservation actions for the formats?
  • Are the Essential Characteristics for each record type comprehensive enough for digital preservation?
  • Are the proposed preservation actions for the formats technically appropriate?
  • Are there appropriate tools for processing and preservation of specific formats that we do not have listed?
  • What can you suggest in terms of appropriate public access versions of the formats?
  • Are there other formats we haven’t identified that need plans?

You can use the issues feature in Github to leave a comment or question or start a discussion. Read more about how to contribute here. So, go ahead, start digging in to your favorite file format and tell NARA your thoughts.

Today NARA is releasing the entirety of our digital preservation framework for public comment. This digital preservation framework consists of our approach to determining risks faced by electronic files, and our plans for preserving different types of file formats. The public is encouraged to join the discussion, September 16 through November 1, 2019, on GitHub.

via Digital Preservation Framework Released for Public Comment – AOTUS.

PEGI Project publishes Environmental Scan of Government Information and Data Preservation Efforts and Challenges

I’m happy to announce that today the PEGI Project released their Environmental Scan of Government Information and Data Preservation Efforts and Challenges. PEGI commissioned the most capable Sarah Lippincott as consultant to write this report, a multimodal environmental scan of at-risk federal digital content. This free, open publication describes the landscape of initiatives within and outside of government that aim to disseminate and preserve government information and data. It describes government-led initiatives, from dissemination through official agency websites to publication on third-party platforms, and reviews a range of initiatives that have emerged in recent years outside of government, both those intended to address perceived gaps and vulnerabilities in the federal government’s curation initiatives and those that add value to publicly available information and datasets. The report also addresses existing policies and infrastructure undergirding both government-led and non-government initiatives. Each section contains representative examples of initiatives relevant to federal government information.

Preserving government information is a long-term responsibility that requires ongoing coordination and commitment. By surveying the current environment, defining key features of the problem space, and identifying gaps and pressing needs, this Environmental Scan contributes to the resources available to all who seek to plan cooperative solutions.

The Preservation of Electronic Government Information (PEGI) Project is a two-year IMLS grant-funded initiative to address national concerns regarding preservation of born-digital government information by cultural memory institutions for long-term public access and use.

via Educopia and the PEGI Project Announce Publication of Environmental Scan of Government Information and Data Preservation Efforts and Challenges — PEGI Project.

Preserving What’s Gone — The Healthcare Guidelines Case

In a recent post on the blog of the Web Science and Digital Libraries Research Group, Shawn Jones reports on research that is vital to all those interested in long term access to government information.

In the post, Jones reports on his research into how much of the content of two sites (more…)

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