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Part 19: Nonlawyer’s journey through Title 44: Use of Documents by Public Printer

This post, all earlier postings in this series, and my “not a lawyer” disclaimer can be found at http://freegovinfo.info/title44 or through our library under Nonlawyer’s Journey through Title 44.

Sec. 1712

TITLE 44–PUBLIC PRINTING AND DOCUMENTS

CHAPTER 17–DISTRIBUTION AND SALE OF PUBLIC DOCUMENTS

Sec. 1712. Documents for use of the Public Printer

The Public Printer may retain out of all documents, bills, and resolutions printed the number of copies absolutely needful for the official use of the Government Printing Office, not exceeding five of each.

(Pub. L. 90-620, Oct. 22, 1968, 82 Stat. 1281.)

Historical and Revision Notes

Based on 44 U.S. Code, 1964 ed., Sec. 81 (Jan. 12, 1895, ch. 23, Sec. 73, 28 Stat. 618).

This portion of the law makes it clear that the Government Printing Office (GPO) can retain documents for its own internal use. This portion of the law will come in handy has GPO digitizes materials still issued in paper and as it builds its National Collection.

I have to admit that I’m unsure of the history of the usage of this provision, which has been around since 1895, I imagine it was to have file copies available in case GPO was asked to provide a reprint. If someone else has better knowledge, I hope they will add something in comments.

CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.


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