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Part 14: Nonlawyer’s journey through Title 44: Reprinting of documents required for sale

This post, all earlier postings in this series, and my “not a lawyer” disclaimer can be found at http://freegovinfo.info/title44 or through our library under Nonlawyer’s Journey through Title 44.

Sec. 1707

TITLE 44–PUBLIC PRINTING AND DOCUMENTS

CHAPTER 17–DISTRIBUTION AND SALE OF PUBLIC DOCUMENTS

Sec. 1707. Reprinting of documents required for sale

The Superintendent of Documents may order reprinted, from time to time, public documents required for sale, subject to the approval of the Secretary or head of the department in which the public document originated. The Revolving Fund shall be reimbursed for the cost of reprints from the moneys received by the Superintendent of Documents from the sale of public documents.

(Pub. L. 90-620, Oct. 22, 1968, 82 Stat. 1280; Pub. L. 101-520, title
II, Sec. 208, Nov. 5, 1990, 104 Stat. 2274.)

Historical and Revision Notes

Based on 44 U.S. Code, 1964 ed., Sec. 79 (Mar. 28, 1904, No. 11, 33 Stat. 584).

Amendments

1990–Pub. L. 101-520 substituted “The Revolving Fund” for “The appropriation for printing and binding”.

This section of the law seems to simply authorize multiple printings of government documents that prove to be be popular. The issuing agency is given veto power over reprinting documents, but I’m not sure how often this has been done. Perhaps one of our GPO readers would be willing to share if they know of times where GPO has wanted to reprint a document for sale but the agency forbade it.

Not much here, but interesting. Next time we’ll look at pricing government documents.

CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.


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