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Free Government Information (FGI) is a place for initiating dialogue and building consensus among the various players (libraries, government agencies, non-profit organizations, researchers, journalists, etc.) who have a stake in the preservation of and perpetual free access to government information. FGI promotes free government information through collaboration, education, advocacy and research.

End-of-term crawl ongoing. Please help us do QA!

The End of Term 2016 collection is still going strong, and we continue to receive email from interested folks about how they can help. Much of the content for the EOT crawl has already been collected and some of it is publicly accessible already through our partners. Last month we posted about ways to help the collection process. At this point volunteers are encouraged to help check the archive to see if content has been archived (i.e., do quality assurance (QA) for the crawls).

Here’s how you can help us assure that we’ve collected and archived as thoroughly and completely as possible:

Step 1: Check the Wayback Machine

Search the Internet Archive to see if the URL has already been captured. Please note this is not a specific End of Term collection search and does not include ALL content archived by the End of Term partners, but will be helpful in identifying whether something has been preserved already.

You may type in specific URLs or domains or subdomains, or try a simple keyword search (in Beta!).

1a: Help Perform Quality Assurance

If you do find a site or URL you were looking for, please click around to check if it was captured completely. A simple way to do this is to click around the archived page – click on navigation, links on the page, images, etc. We need help identifying parts of the sites that the crawlers might have missed, for instance specific documents or pages you are looking for but perhaps we haven’t archived. Please note that crawlers are not perfect and cannot archive some content. IA has a good FAQ on information about the challenges crawlers face.

If you do discover something is missing, you can still nominate pages or documents for archiving using the link in step 3 below.

Step 2: Check the Nomination Tool

Check the Nomination Tool to see if the URL or site has been nominated already. There are a few ways to do this:

Step 3: Nominate It!

If you don’t see the URL you were looking for in any of those searches, please nominate it here.

There are a few plugins and bookmarklets to help nominate via your browser, eg this one created by Matt Price for an event at University of Toronto, and others available at the bottom of this page.

Questions? Please contact the End of Term project at eot-info AT archive DOT org.

Panel on End-of-term crawl and the collection of vulnerable government information

I was honored last week to be part of a panel hosted by OpenTheGovernment and the Bauman Foundation to talk about the End of Term project. Other presenters included Jess Kutch at Coworker.org and Micah Altman, Director of Research at MIT Libraries. I talked about what EOT is doing, as well as some of the other great projects, including Climate Mirror, Data Refuge and the Azimuth backup project, working in concert/parallel to preserve federal climate and environmental data.

I thought the Q&A segment was especially interesting because it raised and answered some of the common questions and concerns that EOT receives on a regular basis. I also learned about a cool project called Violation Tracker, a search engine on corporate misconduct. And I was also able to talk a bit about what are the needs going forward, including the idea of “Information Management Plans” for agencies similar to the idea of “Data Management Plans” for all federally funded research. I was heartened to know that there is interest in that as a wider policy advocacy effort!

The full recorded meeting can be viewed here from Bauman’s adobe connect account.

Here’s more information on the EOT crawl and how you can help.

Coalitions of government, university, and public interest organizations have been working to ensure as much information as possible is preserved and accessible, amid growing concern that important and sensitive government data on climate, labor, and other issues may disappear from the web once the Trump Administration takes office.

Last Thursday, OTG and the Bauman Foundation hosted a meeting of advocates interested in preserving access to government data, and individuals involved in web harvesting efforts. James Jacobs, a government information librarian at Stanford University Library who is working on the End of Term (EOT) web harvest – a joint project between the Internet Archive, the Library of Congress, the Government Publishing Office, and several universities – spoke about the EOT crawl, and explained the various targets of the harvest, including all .gov and .mil web sites, government social media accounts, and more.

Jess Kutch discussed efforts by Coworker.org with Cornell University to preserve information related to workers’ rights and labor protections, and other meeting attendees presented some of their own projects as well. Philip Mattera explained how Good Jobs First is using its Violation Tracker database to scrape and preserve government source material related to corporate misconduct.  

Micah Altman, Director of Research at MIT Libraries, presented on the need for libraries and archives to build better infrastructure for the EOT harvest and other projects – including data portals, cloud infrastructure, and technologies that enhance discoverability – so that data and other government information can be made more easily accessible to the public.

via Volunteers work to preserve access to vulnerable government information, and you can help | OpenTheGovernment.org.

Attend the FGI virtual EOT seed nomination sprint. Help make and preserve .gov history!

If you’ve been waiting for your chance to make history: now’s the time!

Please join us for the FGI virtual End of Term Project Web archiving nomination sprint on Wednesday 11 January 2017 from 9AM – 11AM Pacific / 12 noon – 2PM EST. During that time, We’ll set up a virtual conference room, give a brief presentation of the End of Term crawl and the ins and outs of nominating seeds and then volunteers will be on hand to answer your questions, suggest agencies for deep exploration, and take information about databases and other resources that are tricky to capture with traditional web archiving. RSVP TODAY!

If you’re new to the End of Term Project, it’s a collaborative project to collect and preserve public United States government web sites prior to the end of the current presidential administration on January 20, 2017. Working together, the Library of Congress, California Digital Library, University of North Texas Libraries, Internet Archive, George Washington University Libraries, Stanford University Libraries, and the U.S. Government Publishing Office (GPO) are conducting a thorough Web harvest of the .gov/.mil domain based on prioritized lists of URLs, including social media. As it did in 2008 and 2012 (previous harvests are accessible here), the project’s goal is to document federal agencies’ presence on the World Wide Web during the transition of Presidential administrations, to enhance the existing archival Internet collections, and to give the public access to archived digital government information. This broad comprehensive crawl of the .gov/.mil domain is based on a prioritized list of URLs, including social media.

This sprint to nominate seeds is a big part of making it happen! Hundreds of volunteers and institutions are already involved in the effort. We hope you’ll join the conversation and the fun. There may even be a few (completely non-monetary) prizes for top contributors.

You can pre-register here. We’ll contact you as the date gets closer with access information for the virtual conference.

The final deadline to nominate URLs prior to Inauguration Day is Friday, January 13th, so even if you can’t sprint with us, keep the nominations coming! Questions? Email us at admin AT freegovinfo DOT com.

2016 End of Term (EOT) crawl and how you can help

[Editor’s note: Updated 12/15/16 to include updated email address for End-of-Term project queries (eot-info AT archive DOT org), and information about robots.txt (#1 below) and databases and their underlying data (#5 below). Also updated 12/22/16 with note about duplication of efforts and how to dive deeply into an agency’s domain at the bottom of #1 section. jrj]

Here at FGI, we’ve been tracking the disappearance of government information for quite some time (and librarians have been doing it for longer than we have; see ALA’s long running series published from 1981 until 1998 called “Less Access to Less Information By and About the U.S. Government.”). We’ve recently written about the targeting of NASA’s climate research site and the Department of Energy’s carbon dioxide analysis center for closure.

But ever since the NY Times last week wrote a story “Harvesting Government History, One Web Page at a Time”, there has been renewed worry and interest from the library- and scientific communities as well as the public in archiving government information. And there’s been increased interest in the End of Term (EOT) crawl project — though there’s increased worry about the loss of government information with the incoming Trump administration, it’s important to note that the End of Term crawl has been going on since 2008, with both Republican and Democratic administrations, and will go on past 2016. EOT is working to capture as much of the .gov/.mil domains as we can, and we’re also casting our ‘net to harvest social media content and government information hosted on non-.gov domains (e.g., the St Louis Federal Reserve Bank at www.stlouisfed.org). We’re running several big crawls right now (you can see all of the seeds we have here as well as all of the seeds that have been nominated so far) and will continue to run crawls up to and after the Inauguration as well. We strongly encourage the public to nominate seeds of government sites so that we can be as thorough in our crawling as possible.

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Nominations sought for the U.S. Federal Government Domain End of Term Web Archive

Some of our readers may have seen this announcement already. But in case not, we need your help to preserve the .gov domain. See the announcement below to find out how.

How would YOU like to help preserve the United States federal government .web domain for future generations? But, that’s too huge of a swath of Internet real estate for any one person to preserve, right?!

Wrong! The volunteers working on the End of Term Web Archiving Project are doing just that. But we need your help.

The Library of Congress, California Digital Library, University of North Texas Libraries, Internet Archive, George Washington University Libraries, Stanford University Libraries, and the U.S. Government Publishing Office (GPO) have joined together for a collaborative project to preserve public United States Government websites at the end of the current presidential administration ending January 20, 2017. This web harvest — like its predecessors in 2008 and 2012 — is intended to document the federal government’s presence on the World Wide Web during the transition of Presidential administrations and to enhance the existing collections of the partner institutions. This broad comprehensive crawl of the .gov domain will include as many federal .gov sites as we can find, plus federal content in other domains (such as .mil, .com, and social media content).

And that’s where YOU come in. You can help the project immensely by nominating your favorite .gov website, other federal government websites, or governmental social media account with the End of Term Nomination Tool (link below). You can nominate as many sites as you want. Nominate early and often! Tell your friends, family and colleagues to do the same. Help us preserve the .gov domain for posterity, public access, and long-term preservation. Only YOU can help prevent … link rot!

For more information, contact [email protected]

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