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HathiTrust Federal Documents Registry Progresses to Beta

This is big news indeed. According to a press release, HathiTrust’s Federal Documents Registry — pulled together from the records of over 40 libraries — is now available as a beta release! Mike Furlough and Valerie Glenn gave a very good presentation of the project, methodology, etc. at IFLA last week.

A HUGE thanks to HathiTrust and especially to Valerie Glenn who took on this immense project. Hopefully, it’ll not only help HathiTrust identify materials not yet digitized in its corpus, but also the 1100+ depository libraries and public information users. Hopefully the FDLP will be able to use the registry to put together a union list and holdings of all documents in order to further FDLP’s goal of preservation of all historic FDLP documents. I know I’ll be using the registry to compare Stanford Library’s federal documents collection to the registry in order to find and fill gaps in our collections and also hopefully as copy for documents not yet cataloged.

The Registry is intended to be a comprehensive source of metadata for the US federal documents corpus – material produced at government expense since 1789. While many potential use cases exist, an important use will be the identification of materials that have not yet been digitized and/or deposited into the HathiTrust repository.The Registry was conceived in 2012 as a mechanism to determine how far  HathiTrust had progressed in meeting its goal of a comprehensive digital corpus, as outlined in the ballot initiative from the 2011 Constitutional Convention. In the fall of 2013, we issued a broad call for records, and thanks to the more than 40 libraries who responded we received  more than 25 million records. With such a large aggregation of records, the project team needed to develop multiple approaches for detecting and grouping duplicate records (records describing the same work).

via Federal Documents Registry Progresses to Beta | HathiTrust Digital Library.

Lunchtime listen: DoE Direct Current Episode 4: Backronyms

Do you love government acronyms? Come on, you know you do. Check out episode 4 of the DoE’s Direct Current podcast. In this episode, they interview our colleague Kelly Smith from UC San Diego about her labor of love, the GovSpeak guide, which tracks and explains more than 3,800 acronyms ranging from the familiar to the downright bizarre. And don’t forget to go over to the DoE site and subscribe to Direct Current podcast.

At the University of California-San Diego Library, Kelly Smith wrangles the largest searchable catalog of U.S. government acronyms on the web. After you’ve listened to this episode, head over to the GovSpeak guide and browse through an alphabet soup of more than 3,800 acronyms ranging from the familiar to the downright bizarre.

via Direct Current Episode 4: Backronyms | Department of Energy.

NASA rolls out PubSpace, public portal for NASA-funded research

The 2013 White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) memorandum, “Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research,” is really starting to bare fruit. NASA just announced the creation of PubSpace — which will go hand in hand with the NASA Data Portal — to provide a public access portal to NASA-funded research AND the underlying data.

There are 2 things to note: 1) NASA is using PubMedCentral (PMC) as its repository, along with other federal agencies like National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), National Institute of Standards and technology (NIST), and the Veterans Administration (VA); and 2) as the NASA press release notes, there will be a deficit embargo period placed on NASA funded publications as researchers will have 1 year to deposit articles and data into PubSpace.

This is a very good step in the right Open Access direction for free access to federally funded research and data!

Public access to NASA-funded research data now is just a click away, with the launch of a new agency public access portal. The creation of the NASA-Funded Research Results portal on NASA.gov reflects the agency’s ongoing commitment to providing broad public access to science data.

“At NASA, we are celebrating this opportunity to extend access to our extensive portfolio of scientific and technical publications,” said NASA Deputy Administrator Dava Newman. “Through open access and innovation we invite the global community to join us in exploring Earth, air and space.”

NASA now requires articles in peer-reviewed scholarly journals and papers in juried conference proceedings be publicly accessible via the agency’s PubSpace.

PubSpace is an archive of original science journal articles produced by NASA-funded research and available online without a fee. The data will be available for download, reading and analysis within one year of publication.

via NASA Unveils New Public Web Portal for Research Results | NASA.

“Open Government.” Register to use?

The Sunlight Foundation notes that when an agency like the Department of State publishes a draft of its Open Government plan, the public should not have to provide the agency with personal information in order to read the draft and provide feedback.

Sunlight is providing a a PDF of the State Department’s open government plan so you will not have to agree to the terms of service or privacy policy to read it.

Read about what is going on here: State Department requests feedback on draft 2016 Open Government Plan

Get the Department of State plan here.

Watercolors from USDA

A fascinating niche site: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Pomological Watercolor Collection!

It “documents fruit and nut varieties developed by growers or introduced by USDA plant explorers around the turn of the 20th century. Technically accurate paintings were used to create lithographs illustrating USDA bulletins, yearbooks, and other series distributed to growers and gardeners across America.” It has 7,584 watercolor paintings, and 3,807 images just of of apples!

Hat tip to The Scout Report (August 12, 2016 Volume 22, Number 31) — which is always excellent!

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