Home » post » Not just blogs: delicious FGI!

Not just blogs: delicious FGI!

This week’s “not just blogs” installment will highlight the FGI Del.icio.us project. Some of you may have noticed the “Del.icio.us FGI” link in the top toolbar or the various blue links in the left column.

These words are tags from FGI’s account on Del.icio.us. The tags lead to all of the Web sites we’ve collected/bookmarked for future reference.

Del.icio.us is a social bookmarking service. It offers a way to save and describe (i.e., tag) Web sites for later access. The nice thing about del.icio.us is that you can see who else has tagged the site, what terms they’ve used, how they’ve described it and what other sites *they’ve* tagged under the same term. So if you go to del.icio.us you’ll see the most recent sites tagged as well as the most popular. This is a great way to discover new sites of interest, and share sites of interest with the community.

“So what?!” you might say. We think that del.icio.us can be a very useful tool for the library community. By using del.icio.us, we’re trying to create a defacto portal of sites of interest to the government documents community. And by using del.icio.us, we can collaboratively collect sites of interest. Imagine if librarians use del.icio.us to tag the sites they frequently use as they go about their reference work? In no time, you’ll collect lots of sites that you can then share with your users and your colleagues. You can link to your del.icio.us account on your library’s Web site or display your tag cloud for your community :-)

Additionally, we’re testing out a social hack of delicious by creating and using some common tags — a controlled vocabulary if you will! If you’d like to help us out, start using the common tags listed below. That way, whenever someone tags a Web resource with, for example, “FGI:blogroll”, it’ll show up here and the whole FGI community can work together to collect Web sites and resources of interest. The other way you can help is by using the tag “for:freegovinfo” which will automatically send the link that you’ve tagged to our delicious account.

FGI:articles
FGI:blogroll
FGI:document
FGI:library
FGI:organizations
FGI:research
for:freegovinfo

We hope you’ll explore the sites we’ve tagged, help us build the collection by using those common tags, suggest sites for us to explore by using the “for:freegovinfo” tag, and add us to your network so we can all keep track of what the community is tagging. Librarians are all about collecting, describing and giving access to information, and del.icio.us is a great way to do that online!

For background on delicious, see Melissa Rethlefsen’s article in Library Journal and check out the delicious-iana I’m collecting.

Questions? Still not sure why del.icio.us is useful for libraries? Leave a comment or email us at: admin AT freegovinfo DOT info.

Print Friendly

Creative Commons License
This work, unless otherwise expressly stated, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.


2 Comments

  1. K. Godfrey says:

    Great Stuff! I love to see the use of social software by libraries, especially gov docs folks! I’m going to make great use of these links and hopefully add some of my own. Do you mind Canadian content? Thanks! Keep up the great work!

  2. jrjacobs says:

    Hi K. thanks for the kind comment. by all means, send anything that you think is of interest (don’t forget the “for:freegovinfo” tag!). The nice thing about delicious is that it shows tag overlaps. So I may tag something with “FOIA” and “Canadiandocs.” In that case, someone looking at my FOIA-tagged sites would then see that potentially interesting connection to “Canadiandocs.” And don’t forget to add freegovinfo to your network. We’d love to see how many others are using delicious and recommending links to us!

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Archives

%d bloggers like this: